install multiple versions of GO on the same machine [linux]

This quick tutorial shows how to do install multiple versions of go manually.

I’ll try to prepare a shell script that will do it automatically for you πŸ™‚

  1. download selected GO releases
  2. create directories for specific version of GO
  3. unpack downloaded GO releases
  4. install `go` alternatives
  5. install `godoc` alternatives
  6. install `gofmt` alternatives
  7. configure version of go, godoc & gofmt interactively
  8. alternatively you can configured it in a non-interactive way
  9. set the GOROOT env variable to match the location of selected version of GO
# 1
wget https://storage.googleapis.com/golang/go1.4.2.linux-amd64.tar.gz
wget https://storage.googleapis.com/golang/go1.4.3.linux-amd64.tar.gz
wget https://storage.googleapis.com/golang/go1.5.linux-amd64.tar.gz
wget https://storage.googleapis.com/golang/go1.5.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz

# 2
sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/go/1.4.2/
sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/go/1.4.3/
sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/go/1.5/
sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/go/1.5.1/

# 3
sudo tar -C /usr/local/go/1.4.2/ --strip-components=1 -xzf go1.4.2.linux-amd64.tar.gz
sudo tar -C /usr/local/go/1.4.3/ --strip-components=1 -xzf go1.4.3.linux-amd64.tar.gz
sudo tar -C /usr/local/go/1.5/ --strip-components=1 -xzf go1.5.linux-amd64.tar.gz
sudo tar -C /usr/local/go/1.5.1/ --strip-components=1 -xzf go1.5.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz

# 4
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/go go /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/go 2
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/go go /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/go 3
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/go go /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/go 4
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/go go /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/go 5

# 5
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/godoc godoc /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/godoc 2
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/godoc godoc /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/godoc 3
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/godoc godoc /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/godoc 4
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/godoc godoc /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/godoc 5

# 6
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/gofmt gofmt /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/gofmt 2
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/gofmt gofmt /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/gofmt 3
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/gofmt gofmt /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/gofmt 4
sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/gofmt gofmt /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/gofmt 5

# 7 - If you want to configure version of go, godoc & gofmt interactively then use:
sudo update-alternatives --config go
sudo update-alternatives --config godoc
sudo update-alternatives --config gofmt

# 8 - If you want to configure version non-interactively then use:
sudo update-alternatives --set go /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/go
sudo update-alternatives --set godoc /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/godoc
sudo update-alternatives --set gofmt /usr/local/go/1.4.2/bin/gofmt

sudo update-alternatives --set go /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/go
sudo update-alternatives --set godoc /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/godoc
sudo update-alternatives --set gofmt /usr/local/go/1.4.3/bin/gofmt

sudo update-alternatives --set go /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/go
sudo update-alternatives --set godoc /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/godoc
sudo update-alternatives --set gofmt /usr/local/go/1.5/bin/gofmt

sudo update-alternatives --set go /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/go
sudo update-alternatives --set godoc /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/godoc
sudo update-alternatives --set gofmt /usr/local/go/1.5.1/bin/gofmt

# 9 - set GOROOT to your current version of GO
export GOROOT=$(dirname $(dirname $(readlink -f $(which go | cut -d" " -f3))))

Getting the Brightness Control to work on Lenovo ThinkPad with Linux Mint 17 (x64) installed and with Nvidia Quadro K1000M on board

I haven’t had much problems with getting the Brightness Control to work in Mint 16, but after installing v17 I had to struggle much more.

I honestly admit that I don’t know which of the following steps actually did the trick, nevertheless it works now πŸ™‚

OK, I’m currently running Mint 17 x64 on Lenovo W530 with Nvidia Quadro K1000M and with Nvidia 331.38 installed.

Display mode in BIOS is set to “Discrete Mode”.

Here’s a list of things I did:

– I’ve updated the bios to latest available version (G5ET99WW (2.59))

Here’s my tutorial how to upgrade it from a USB pendrive

– Generated a new xorg.conf using “NVIDIA X Server Settings” -> “X Server Display Configuration” -> “Save to X Configuration file”

– Then added “EnableBrightnessControl=1” to the device section in /etc/X11/xorg.conf:

     Section "Device"
         Identifier     "Device0"
         Driver         "nvidia"
         VendorName     "NVIDIA Corporation"
         BoardName      "Quadro K1000M"
         Option         "RegistryDwords" "EnableBrightnessControl=1"
     EndSection

– After rebooting, the only thing I could find in /sys/class/backlight was:

thinkpad_screen

– Then I tried to set the “GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT” in /etc/default/grub to:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=vendor"

or

> GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nox2apic acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=vendor"

but that didn’t work

– Finally I set it to only:

> GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nox2apic"

– and after rebooting Brightness Control buttons (Fn+F8 & F9) started to work
and in the /sys/class/backlight I found acpi_video0 instead of thinkpad_screen

     $ ll /sys/class/backlight
     total 0
     lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Aug 10 10:14 acpi_video0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:01.0/0000:01:00.0/backlight/acpi_video0/

I hope this will help someone.
Pls drop some comments if it helped you!

Cheers,
SeΓ±or QA

Create a bootable USB on Linux (Mint, Ububtu) pendrive to upgrade Lenovo ThinkPad W530 BIOS

Recently I had to update the bios of my laptop from a USB pendrive, because I had no CD/DVD drive around.

Cameron Seader’s post http://blog.seader.us/2013/10/lenovo-bios-update-method-for-linux-and.html came very handy, but used an obsolete tool so I updated his instructions a bit to make them work.

1. Get the machine type and model of your laptop
In order to grab this information you can either go to the BIOS or use dmidecode or hwinfo.
In my case it was ThinkPad W530 2438-2KU.

2. Download appropriate bios update iso from Lenovo’s site
I got mine: “g5uj22us.iso” from http://support.lenovo.com/en_US/downloads/detail.page?DocID=DS029170

3. Extract the boot image from the iso
To do it you can use genisoimage, which can be installed using regular:

$ sudo apt-get install genisoimage

or can be downloaded from: http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/lucid/man1/genisoimage.1.html
Once you have this tool, run:

$ geteltorito g5uj22us.iso > biosupdate.img

4. Copy the boot image to the USB pendrive

$ sudo dd if=biosupdate.img of=/dev/usbthumdrive bs=512K

Reboot and boot from USB to run the Flash Utility

Cheers,
SeΓ±or QA

How to unit test Django’s Function Based Views

Let’s assume than the URL pattern to your Function Based View is defined like that:
urls.py

urlpatterns = patterns(
    ...,
    url(r'^$', views.index, name='index'),
    ...
)

and your function based view looks like this:
views.py

@api_view(['GET'])
@permission_classes((AllowAny,))
def index(request):
    data = {
        'field': 'value'
    }
    return Response(data)

Then you can unit test such view by creating a minimal instance
of the HttpRequest and pass it to that view.
I tried to mock to test such view with the Mock library, by with no luck!!!
If case you know how to do it with Mock, then let me know!

def test_index_function_based_view():
    _request = HttpRequest()
    _request.method = 'GET'
    request = Request(_request)
    response = index(request)
    assert response.data['field'] ==  'value'

Run your Selenium driven tests in parallel using TestNG.

Sometime ago I came across this post:
http://rationaleemotions.wordpress.com/2013/07/31/parallel-webdriver-executions-using-testng/
And I thought it’d be good to have it in a repo to save you time setting up your own project.

Basically this example project runs JUnit tests in parallel using TestNG.
Tests are grouped by the browser in which they’re going to be executed (have a look at the TestNG XML Suite files in src/test/resources).
As you might have guessed to drive the browsers we use Selenium WebDriver πŸ™‚
And of course you can run your tests locally or remotely using Selenium GRID.

You can find the repo here: https://github.com/kowalcj0/parallel-selenium-with-testng

And here’s a video showing this project in action πŸ™‚

GEE [Jmeter-ec2] – video tutorials part 2

Hi All,

I just added few more videos showing how to configure your test environment to run your JMeter tests:

  • locally on a Vagrant box
  • using remote machines
  • and on Amazon EC2

04 – create a first test plan, run it using Gee and a vagrant box
Shows how to create a new test plan from a template project. Then how to run it using GEE on our local vagrant box.

05 – configure passwordless ssh access to a linux box
Shows how to configure a passwordless SSH access to a remote Linux box. Such access is required by Gee to run your JMeter tests on a remote machine.

06 – automatically install JMeter with plugins on a remote machine
Shows how to use download-jmeter.sh script to download JMeter and JMeter-plugins automatically on a linux host that will be used by GEE to run your load tests.

07 – run your JMeter test on remote linux hosts
Shows how to configure GEE and remote Linux hosts to run your JMeter tests. This video might come handy when you’d like to run your tests using internal network resources.

08 – run your JMeter test on Amazon EC2
Shows how to configure GEE to run your JMeter tests using Amazon EC2 services.

Configure your Logitech Performance MX Mouse buttons to work with Linux Mint

To make your extra mouse buttons work on Linux Mint (I’ve tested it with v15) follow all the steps listed in this tutorial except the step 4 πŸ™‚

Once you get to step 4, use this key mappings to make the ‘zoom’ and ‘switch between windows’ buttons work as on windows.

vi $HOME/.xbindkeysrc
...

# show all windows: Scale
"xte 'keydown Control_L' 'keydown Alt_L' 'key Down' 'keyup Control_L' 'keyup Alt_L'"
  b:10 + release

# Zooming with Logitech Performance MX mouse
# thx to: http://www.ralf-oechsner.de/opensource/page/logitech_performance_mx
# Press 'zoom' button and scroll up/down to zoom in/out
# then press the 'zoom' button again to exit from the 'zoom' mode
"xte 'keydown Control_L' &"
   b:13
"xte 'keyup Control_L' &"
   Control + b:13

I hope that you’ll like Mint even more from now on πŸ™‚

Vim – tips and tricks

Record a macro that will delete everything after matching character and repeat it N-times.
In this example we’re going to use ‘=’ as the matching character.

qaf=D⏎q

Where:
‘qa’ – to start recording and save it under ‘a’ buffer
‘f=’ – find ‘=’ character
‘D’ – Delete everything to the EOL
‘⏎’ – press ‘enter’ to go to the beginning of next line
‘q’ – to stop recording the macro

then to repeat the macro N-times, i.e. repeat it 5 times:

5@a

‘5’ – the number of times you’d like to repeat the macro
‘@a’ – play macro recorded under ‘a’ buffer

VIM macro delete everything after matching character and repeat N-times

VIM macro delete everything after matching character and repeat N-times

GEE [Jmeter-ec2] – video tutorials part 1

I finally started recording videos explaining how to use Gee.
Gee is a tool based on a JMeter-EC2 project by Oliver Lloyd.
It allows you to run JMeter tests on:

  • Amazon EC2
  • Vagrant boxes
  • Linux hosts

Running your tests using this tool is better than using the standard distributed mode in Jmeter, because it doesn’t require constant communication between the master node and slave nodes.

Here are first few videos explaining how to clone the project, spawn new vagrant box and finally how to run an example project on that virtual box.
Hope you all will find in useful πŸ™‚

GEE [Jmeter-ec2] – 01 – cloning the project

GEE [Jmeter-ec2] – 02 – initialize vagrant box

GEE [Jmeter-ec2] – 03 – running an example test on a vagrant box

How to compile and install latest version of Vim with support for: X11 clipboard, ruby, python 2 or python 3

This was tested with vim 7.4.(1-398)
(Update: 2013-12-03 apparently you can’t build vim with support for both python 2 and python 3, so I had to update this tutorial a bit πŸ™‚ )
(Update: 2014-08-09 Added three commands: “hg pull”, “hg update” and “hg status” to pull the latest version of the repo)

First of all install all the dependencies required when compiling Vim with additional options:

@:~> sudo apt-get install mercurial python python-dev python3 python3-dev ruby ruby-dev libx11-dev libxt-dev libgtk2.0-dev  libncurses5  ncurses-dev

Then clone official vim repo, configure it with support for: X11 clipboard, ruby, python 2 or 3 and few other cool options πŸ™‚

@:~> hg clone https://vim.googlecode.com/hg/ vim
## if you already had this repo cloned, then update it:
@:~> hg pull
@:~> hg update
## and then check if you definitely have the latest version:
@:~> hg summary
parent: 6121:913d16b4904c
 Added tag v7-4-398 for changeset f62b2e76dd80
branch: default
commit: (clean)
update: 52 new changesets (update)
@:~> cd vim/src
##
## this will configure it with python 2
##
@:~> ./configure \
    --enable-perlinterp \
    --enable-pythoninterp \
    --enable-rubyinterp \
    --enable-cscope \
    --enable-gui=auto \
    --enable-gtk2-check \
    --enable-gnome-check \
    --with-features=huge \
    --enable-multibyte \
    --with-x \
    --with-compiledby="Senor QA <senor@qa>" \
    --with-python-config-dir=/usr/lib/python2.7/config-x86_64-linux-gnu
##
## and with python 3
##
@:~> ./configure \
    --enable-perlinterp \
    --enable-python3interp \
    --enable-rubyinterp \
    --enable-cscope \
    --enable-gui=auto \
    --enable-gtk2-check \
    --enable-gnome-check \
    --with-features=huge \
    --enable-multibyte \
    --with-x \
    --with-compiledby="Senor QA <senor@qa>" \
    --with-python3-config-dir=/usr/lib/python3.3/config-3.3m-x86_64-linux-gnu

Next step is to compile our setup:

@:~> make

Then if you want you can check if all the features were compiled properly:

VIM - Vi IMproved 7.4 (2013 Aug 10, compiled Aug  9 2014 15:37:52)
Included patches: 1-398
Compiled by Me <senor@qa>
Huge version with GTK2 GUI.  Features included (+) or not (-):
+acl             +farsi           +mouse_netterm   +syntax
+arabic          +file_in_path    +mouse_sgr       +tag_binary
+autocmd         +find_in_path    -mouse_sysmouse  +tag_old_static
+balloon_eval    +float           +mouse_urxvt     -tag_any_white
+browse          +folding         +mouse_xterm     -tcl
++builtin_terms  -footer          +multi_byte      +terminfo
+byte_offset     +fork()          +multi_lang      +termresponse
+cindent         +gettext         -mzscheme        +textobjects
+clientserver    -hangul_input    +netbeans_intg   +title
+clipboard       +iconv           +path_extra      +toolbar
+cmdline_compl   +insert_expand   -perl            +user_commands
+cmdline_hist    +jumplist        +persistent_undo +vertsplit
+cmdline_info    +keymap          +postscript      +virtualedit
+comments        +langmap         +printer         +visual
+conceal         +libcall         +profile         +visualextra
+cryptv          +linebreak       +python          +viminfo
+cscope          +lispindent      -python3         +vreplace
+cursorbind      +listcmds        +quickfix        +wildignore
+cursorshape     +localmap        +reltime         +wildmenu
+dialog_con_gui  -lua             +rightleft       +windows
+diff            +menu            +ruby            +writebackup
+digraphs        +mksession       +scrollbind      +X11
+dnd             +modify_fname    +signs           -xfontset
-ebcdic          +mouse           +smartindent     +xim
+emacs_tags      +mouseshape      -sniff           +xsmp_interact
+eval            +mouse_dec       +startuptime     +xterm_clipboard
+ex_extra        -mouse_gpm       +statusline      -xterm_save
+extra_search    -mouse_jsbterm   -sun_workshop    -xpm
   system vimrc file: "$VIM/vimrc"
     user vimrc file: "$HOME/.vimrc"
 2nd user vimrc file: "~/.vim/vimrc"
      user exrc file: "$HOME/.exrc"
  system gvimrc file: "$VIM/gvimrc"
    user gvimrc file: "$HOME/.gvimrc"
2nd user gvimrc file: "~/.vim/gvimrc"
    system menu file: "$VIMRUNTIME/menu.vim"
  fall-back for $VIM: "/usr/local/share/vim"
Compilation: gcc -c -I. -Iproto -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -DFEAT_GUI_GTK  -pthread -I/usr/include/gtk-2.0 -I/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gtk-2.0/include -I/usr/include/atk-1.0 -I/usr/include/cairo -I/usr/include/gdk-pixbuf-2.0 -I/usr/include/pango-1.0 -I/usr/include/gio-unix-2.0/ -I/usr/include/freetype2 -I/usr/include/glib-2.0 -I/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/glib-2.0/include -I/usr/include/pixman-1 -I/usr/include/libpng12 -I/usr/include/harfbuzz     -g -O2 -U_FORTIFY_SOURCE -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=1      
Linking: gcc   -L. -Wl,-Bsymbolic-functions -Wl,-z,relro -L/build/buildd/ruby1.9.1-1.9.3.484/debian/lib -rdynamic -Wl,-export-dynamic  -L/usr/local/lib -Wl,--as-needed -o vim   -lgtk-x11-2.0 -lgdk-x11-2.0 -latk-1.0 -lgio-2.0 -lpangoft2-1.0 -lpangocairo-1.0 -lgdk_pixbuf-2.0 -lcairo -lpango-1.0 -lfontconfig -lgobject-2.0 -lglib-2.0 -lfreetype   -lSM -lICE -lXt -lX11 -lXdmcp -lSM -lICE  -lm -ltinfo -lnsl   -ldl    -L/usr/lib/python2.7/config-x86_64-linux-gnu -lpython2.7 -lpthread -ldl -lutil -lm -Xlinker -export-dynamic -Wl,-O1 -Wl,-Bsymbolic-functions   -lruby-1.9.1 -lpthread -lrt -ldl -lcrypt -lm  -L/usr/lib

Just to make sure it works as it should, launch newly compiled ./vim, and type:

:echo has("python")

It should return 1 if it was compiled properly πŸ™‚

If you’re happy then install it πŸ™‚

@:~> sudo make install

Then locate the vim command

@:~> which vim
vim is /usr/local/bin/vim
vim is /usr/bin/vim

As you can see, there are two installed on my system.
To make newly installed version “/usr/local/bin/vim” the default one, we’ll use “update-alternatives”.

@:~> sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/vim" "vim" "/usr/local/bin/vim" 1
@:~> sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/vi" "vi" "/usr/local/bin/vim" 1

Then use “update-alternatives” to switch between installed versions πŸ™‚

@:~> sudo update-alternatives --config vim
There are 2 choices for the alternative vim (providing /usr/bin/vim).

  Selection    Path                Priority   Status
------------------------------------------------------------
* 0            /usr/bin/vim.basic   30        auto mode
  1            /usr/bin/vim.basic   30        manual mode
  2            /usr/local/bin/vim   1         manual mode

Press enter to keep the current choice[*], or type selection number: 2
@:~> 
@:~> # now let's change symbolic link for vi
@:~> 
@:~> sudo update-alternatives --config vi
There are 3 choices for the alternative vi (providing /usr/bin/vi).

  Selection    Path                Priority   Status
------------------------------------------------------------
* 0            /usr/bin/vim.basic   30        auto mode
  1            /usr/bin/vim.basic   30        manual mode
  2            /usr/bin/vim.tiny    10        manual mode
  3            /usr/local/bin/vim   1         manual mode

Press enter to keep the current choice[*], or type selection number: 3
update-alternatives: using /usr/local/bin/vim to provide /usr/bin/vi (vi) in manual mode

Last thing to do is to check where the /usr/bin/vim points at:

@:~> ll /usr/bin/vim
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 21 Jun  7 11:29 /usr/bin/vim -> /etc/alternatives/vim*

Then check where the /etc/alternatives/vim points at.
If everything went fine, it should be pointing at: /usr/local/bin/vim

@:~> ll /etc/alternatives/vim
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 18 Nov 19 12:17 /etc/alternatives/vim -> /usr/local/bin/vim*

Happy Vimming πŸ™‚
J